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  • A wonderful book — “Regional Theatre: The Revolutionary Stage” — was first published in 1973, and covered the earliest days of regional theatre. The author, Joseph Wesley Zeigler, spent the 1960s working in the regional theatre — at Arena State in Washington, The Actor’s Workshop in San Francisco, the Ithaca Festival in upstate New York, and Theatre Communications Group in New York City. He is now head of Joseph Wesley Zeigler & Associates, a consulting firm for arts organizations.

    “Regional Theatre: The Revolutionary Stage” is a social history of a recent American cultural phenomenon—the development since World War II of numerous nonprofit regional theatres which, as a group, have changed the complexion of the American theatre. It is the story of a revolution, now over, and a call for a new purpose to follow it. After a discussion of the background against which the regional theatre movement began, the author traces the histories of individual theatre companies. And yet the book is less about actors, directors, and productions than it is about the struggle to create and sustain new cultural forms, and the tension between regional and central phenomena.

    Mr. Zeigler sees several related themes: institutionalism — theatre as a continuing creative organism; decentralization—the bringing of theatre to all areas of the country; and the development of a National Theatre to serve the entire country. A significant element in the book consists of examination of some of the important funding programs which have aided the development of regional theatres. http://goo.gl/t82h6I

  • Ashley Kravitz

    I find it extremely interesting to notice that most of these theatre troops/ companies started in the midwest/ east coast areas.. such as Ohio, Detroit, New Jersey, and New York. Obviously the uproar for broadway companies expanded nationwide, I just think its crazy to think about where it all started. Also I found it very interesting to read about the woman’s Shakespeare company and the whole bondage itself. Obviously these women are very comfortable around each other because they are each others co workers… but sometimes you can’t find that due to the differences between people. This day in age you do find it common for everyone to be equal around each other, but i feel that in 1996 that wasn’t as common so its amazing to see that no one let any negativity show through the onstage performances.

  • Ashley Kravitz

    I find it extremely interesting to notice that most of these theatre troops/ companies started in the midwest/ east coast areas.. such as Ohio, Detroit, New Jersey, and New York. Obviously the uproar for broadway companies expanded nationwide, I just think its crazy to think about where it all started. Also I found it very interesting to read about the woman’s Shakespeare company and the whole bondage itself. Obviously these women are very comfortable around each other because they are each others co workers… but sometimes you can’t find that due to the differences between people. This day in age you do find it common for everyone to be equal around each other, but i feel that in 1996 that wasn’t as common so its amazing to see that no one let any negativity show through the onstage performances.

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