The cast of Improbable Theatre's "Opening Skinner's Box" in London (Photo by Topher McGillis)

Lincoln Center Festival Announces 2017 Lineup

There will be four theatre productions in addition to dance, film, and music programming.

NEW YORK CITY: Lincoln Center Festival has announced its 2017 program, which will include 20 international productions and 43 performances in dance, music, theatre, and film. The event will take place July 10-30,

“The point of the festival has always been to provide perspectives that we  wouldn’t have had otherwise,” said Nigel Redden, director of the Lincoln Center Festival, in a statement.  “One thing that has emerged as a theme this year—because the world has certainly changed since the 2016 festival—is that our international festival has become about borders and specifically about crossing them.”

The four theatre offerings will be:

Opening Skinner’s Box (July 10-12), adapted from the book by Lauren Slater by London’s Improbable Theatre, takes the audience through a collection of famous 20th-century psychological experiments and the people who created them.

While I Was Waiting (July 19-21), by Syrian authors Omar Abusaada and Mohammad Al Attar, looks at the aftermath of political upheaval in the Syrian capital of Damascus through the family of Taim, a young man who has fallen into a coma. The play is based on interviews of Syrian families with comatose relatives.

Yitzhak Rabin: Chronicle of an Assassination (July 19), by Israeli author Amos Gitai, looks at the violence leading up to the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in 1995, and the chaotic aftermath. It originally premiered at the 2016 Avignon Festival.

To the End of the Land (July 24-27), by Israeli author David Grossman, originally from the Cameri Theatre of Tel Aviv, about the intersecting lives of three teenagers who meet in a hospital during the Six-Day War of 1967 and their lives after.

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