Storm Large in "Crazy Enough" at Portland Center Stage in 2009. (Photo by Owen Carey)

Portland Center Stage Announces 2018-19 Season

Artistic director Chris Coleman’s last season will feature the return of Storm Large’s ‘Crazy Enough,’ a decade after its premiere.

PORTLAND, ORE.: Portland Center Stage at the Armory (PSC) has announced its 2018-19 season, the last curated by director Chris Coleman, who will depart to lead Denver Center for the Performing Arts Theatre Company in May.

“With this season announcement, I offer my gratitude for my time in Portland in the best way that I know how—by working with the fine team at the Armory to craft a new season that is so exciting it makes it difficult to leave. And somewhat to my chagrin, we’ve managed just that,” said Coleman in a statement.

The season will start with The Color Purple (Sept. 15-Oct. 28), with book by Marsha Norman, and music and lyrics by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis, and Stephen Bray. The musical, based on the book by Alice Walker, follows the inspirational Celie as she journeys from childhood to womanhood in the mid-20th century in the South. Timothy Douglas will direct.

Next up will be Adam Bock’s A Life (Sept. 29-Nov. 11), commissioned by PCS, about a hopelessly single man who obsessively pores over astrological charts to cope after a breakup. Rose Riordan will direct.

Just in time for the holidays will be A Christmas Memory (Nov. 24-Dec. 30), by Truman Capote, an autobiographical recollection of the author’s childhood in rural Alabama. Brandon Woolley will direct.

Running in repertory will be Winter Song, by Merideth Kaye Clark and Woolley, an original presentation of songs that celebrate the season of winter. Woolley will direct.

The holiday cheer will continue with the Second City’s A Christmas Carol: Twist Your Dickens (Nov. 27-Dec. 23), by Peter Gwinn and Bobby Mort, an adult comedy filled with holiday sketches and improvisation. Ron West will direct.

The season will continue with Sense & Sensibility (Jan. 12-Feb. 10, 2019), adapted by Kate Hamill from Jane Austen, a theatrical retelling of the classic satire about the three Dashwood sisters dealing with the death of their father and sudden loss of fortune. Eric Tucker will direct.

Following will be Buyer & Cellar (Jan. 19-March 3, 2019), by Jonathan Tolins, a comedy about a struggling actor in Los Angeles who takes a job working in the basement mall in Barbra Streisand’s Malibu home. Woolley will direct.

Next will be Tiny Beautiful Things (Feb. 23-March 31, 2019), adapted by Nia Vardalos from the book by Cheryl Strayed, about an anonymous online advice columnist and her journey to building a beloved column celebrating humanity. Riordan will direct.

Following will be Until the Flood (March 16-April 21, 2019), written and performed by Dael Orlandersmith, an exploration of the aftermath of the riots in Ferguson, Mo., crafted from interviews with people from the region. Neel Keller will direct.

The season will continue with Mary Kathryn Nagle’s Crossing Mnisose (April 13-May 5, 2019), about Sacajawea’s story and the violence she endured leading the U.S. Corps of Discovery up the Mnisose, the Missouri River. Molly Smith will direct.

Next will be David Hare’s The Breath of Life (May 4-June 16, 2019), about the unlikely relationship that forms between a dutiful wife and the longtime mistress of a man who moves to America with a younger woman.

Following will be Native Gardens (May 18-June 16, 2019), by Karen Zacarías, a comedy about the clash of cultures when a Latino couple moves next to a well-established D.C. couple and their prize-worthy garden.

The season will conclude with the return of Crazy Enough (June 15-30, 2019), written and performed by Storm Large, an autobiographical musical about Large’s childhood growing up with a schizophrenic mother and the way music helped her to overcome heartache. The show was developed at JAW: A Playwrights Festival in 2008 and had its world premiere at the Armory in 2009.

Founded in 1988, Portland Center Stage is committed to bringing stories to life in unexpected ways for its Oregon audience.