Art by Jason Simon

Token Theatre Friends: British Invasion

On this episode, it’s ‘Angels in America” ($200+) vs ‘Yerma’ (40+). Plus, ‘The Great Comet’s’ Grace McLean drops by to discuss music-making and angry women.

Twice a month on the Token Theatre Friends video series, theatre critics Jose Solís and Diep Tran bring a POC perspective to the performing arts. They discuss three shows at three different price points, then offer their picks for the best one for the money.

This week, the three shows are:

Angels in America by Tony Kushner, currently running on Broadway at the Neil Simon Theatre. The friends sat through 7-plus hours of the show, about the AIDS crises and American angst in the ’80s. It’s an import from London’s National Theatre. (Spoiler: Diep and Jose disagree!)

Yerma, adapted and directed by Simon Stone from Federico García Lorca’s 1934 play, running through April 21 at the Park Avenue Armory. In this adaption, a London woman sacrifices everything to have a child. It’s also another British import!

Ms. estrada, created by the Q Brothers Collective, running at the Flea Theater through April 28. In this modern update to Lysistrata, a group of college women go on a sex strike, plus there’s hip-hop. (This one is not a British import.)

Grace McLean performs at the Esse Jazz Club in Moscow. (Photo by Pavel Korbut)

This week’s guest is actor/musician Grace McLean (Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812). She’s performing a concert at the Sheen Center in Lower Manhattan on April 20, and she talks about the women that influenced her, the roles she gets typecast in, and her band: Grace McLean & Them Apples.

Plus for the 11 ‘O Clock Number (which is really a rave), Diep and Jose fan out over NBC’s live musical broadcast of Jesus Christ Superstar. See? Sometimes they talk about happy things!

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