• longplay

    “It’s much harder, to my unschooled ear/eye, to accept that same construction once the subject has a name: “Jo writes about what they know.”

    How would you handle telling someone to give a script to a person demanding the use of gender-neutral pronouns? Do you say, “Give the script to them.”? That is very unclear, even if you point a the intended recipient.

    I suppose I could use the made-up “zim” or “zir”, which have history in the language, but I refuse to do that. Thus I agree with the Mark Harris quote you included: “My feeling is that everybody has the right to be referred to without slurs or derogation, but that that’s not the same as the right to personally customized language.”

  • Tania L. Moore

    I HATE inclusive language. HATE it. They changed ALL of my hymns in my home church to make them inclusive. I just sing the original words and let the liberals think they won.

    • Molly Brennan

      I’m sure Jesus supports that hate.

      • Tania L. Moore

        .??? Last time I checked? The Bible spoke of God the FATHER, not God the transvestite.

      • Tania L. Moore

        Yeah, Yeah, Yeah. Last time I checked it was God the Father, not God the Mother or God the IT.

      • Tania L. Moore

        Ooooooo Miss high and mighty. I’m sure he also supports your self-righteousness too!

  • argent

    I really liked this article–not just because you came around but because you showed your process. As a former raging homo/transphobe and a current nonbinary transgender person, I know quite well that minds can be changed, and that persuading someone of a new political position can actually allow them to live a life more at peace with themself. I have trouble talking about the things I used to say and believe about sexuality and gender–it’s embarrassing! But I think it’s very necessary to, as you said, “bring others along”. Thanks for this.

  • Molly Brennan

    Thanks for coming around, Robert. As a person in a domestic relationship with a they/them, and who also has multiple creative partners existing beyond the gender binary, it is heartening to know advocacy can be gained through an interest to understand. Theatre is my favorite way to be with people. At its best it accesses our potential as imaginative, empathetic creatures. At its worst it is dogmatic academia, holding fast to rules about language, gender, race, age, etc. We as artists who tell peoples’ stories should have no problem expanding our imaginations about each other, and integrating language into our everyday lives that celebrates our fellow humans’ identities.