• Emma

    Thank you for this! Women playwrights have shows ready and waiting to go!

  • Dante Olivia Smith

    “#MeToo isn’t just about outing men as abusers. It’s also about dismantling a system that has forced women to be silent—about giving women space and resources, and protection, to do our work and tell our stories.”
    The representation of women and other minorities in design and production rolls is abysmal. Diversity and Inclusion should be goals for all positions not just the headline grabbing ones of directors, writers and actors. It is past time for this spotlight to shine on all theatrical collaborators, not just the ones who are face forward.

  • Bobby Andrews

    What constitutes an “all-female creative team”? The set, lights and sound were designed by men.

  • Mister Smith

    My Fair Lady was not a good example of women being treated poorly because Eliza was a strong character who made her own decisions and she guided her own fate by choosing to change. She was never a doormat.
    Shirley MacLaine’s Sweet Charity was nuanced, if you paid attention to the movie.

  • Mister Smith

    Both of my comments were deleted. Does the author of this piece dislike any opinions that differ slightly from their own? All I said was that Eliza Doolittle was a strong character who made a choice to change her life, and did. She was nobody’s doormat. She was the strongest character in both the play and movie.
    I also pointed out that Shirley MacLaine’s performance in the movie version of Sweet Charity was nuanced to anyone who was paying attention.
    And that post was worth deleting?

    • Nothing was deleted, we just fell behind on moderating comments. Apologies!

      • Mister Smith

        I realized that after I had posted more than once. I am so sorry! I did delete one post. Thanks for replying.

  • Mister Smith

    Both of my comments were deleted. Does the author of this piece dislike any opinions that differ slightly from their own? All I said was that Eliza Doolittle was a strong character who made a choice to change her life, and did. She was nobody’s doormat. She was the strongest character in both the play and movie.
    I also pointed out that Shirley MacLaine’s performance in the movie version of Sweet Charity was nuanced to anyone who was paying attention.
    And that post was worth deleting?

  • Mister Smith

    Oh, and if you were paying attention to the movie version of Sweet Charity, you will see the “shades of gray’ Shirley MacLaine added to the character quite subtly and beautifully. Sutton Foster is fantastic, but give credit where it’s due, please.

  • Mister Smith

    I agree with you on Carousel and Kiss Me, Kate (mainly for the ending of KMK) but Eliza Doolittle was no doormat. She was a strong woman from start to finish. She was the one who decided to take advantage of an opportunity and make that a reality in her life. So you can’t lump My Fair Lady in with the others.

  • theatregeek

    There’s a lot of great points here. So it would be nice if the author didnt undercut themself with incorrect numbers at the start which would have taken two minutes to fact check.
    Women directors on Broadway this season: Rebecca Taichman, Mariane Elliott, Pam McKinnon, Julie Taymor, Anne Kaufman, and Susan Stroman codirected with Hal Prince. (Should there be more? Absolutely. But why is the author stating it was 2?) There’s also way more than 19 shows this season. And what is Joe Mantello’s third show? I only see Three Tall Women and Boys in the Band.

    • Good catch. We’ve corrected the above; there are in fact a total of 34 shows in this Broadway season, and 6 female directors: Anne Kauffman, Susan Stroman, Marianne Elliott (who technically directed 2 of the 34 shows), Pam MacKinnon, Julie Taymor, and Tina Landau. Rebecca Taichman’s “Indecent” opened last season, and Joe Mantello’s third show is the long-running “Wicked.”

      • theatregeek

        I’m aware “Indecent” opened last season. It was one of my favorite shows. Her production of “Time and the Conways” opened this season, however. So its 7 female directors.

        And I see with Joe Mantello. The way the work was being discussed it seemed to imply new productions.